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20121129
20121129
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it develops into a warm friendship and sometimes not so much. boston globe political reporter matt adviser is here he was at the white house reporting on that lunch and lts presidential historian douglas brinkley, my pal, whose most recent book, great book, "cronkite." let me start with matt. we knew this was coming. the president said he wanted to do it, and there is a tradition of burying the hatchet. what else got done? did that get done? did they bury the hatchet? >> it was a symbolic moment that seems mostly symbolic. that doesn't appear to be much substance that came out of the meeting. you had romney driving up in the black suv -- he didn't drive, he was in the passenger side, but all alone -- nobody to open the door for him. >> how democratic. >> nobody opened the door inaug built in the background. >> no secret service? >> no secret service for romney. in fact, i think he had to provide his name and date of birth and social security -- >> no. >> yeah. just like anybody else. >> rbt they sweethearts, gate nazis. the president offered up a possible see of working together with forme
in the "boston globe." here is what warren rudman says, "frankly, i blame the american people as much as congress. they talk a great game. they are against deficit spending as long as it did not affect anything but the benefit from." guest: that is true. that is the basic problem with democracy. there is something called fiscal illusion. economists have written about this for decades. people would rather see tax cuts and then maintain current spending or higher spending even if that leads to deficits. that forces future generations, future taxpayers to foot the bill. that is irresponsible behavior. that is where we got to where we are at, unsustainable spending. we cannot raise taxes enough to pay for the spending that we have written into law at this point. we have to come to terms with this basic problem of democracy. we cannot both have all the spending we want and not pay for taxes. -- not pay for it in taxes. host: seth hanlon, last year you tied in the unemployment benefits argument with the payroll tax in an article let you wrote. unemployment benefits are due to expire as well as the end
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